Technical specifications

Massive par­quet con­struc­tion:

 = Oberfläche (Unbehandelt)

 = Nut und Feder

 = Dehnungs Nuten 

Massive plank con­struc­tion:

 = Vierseitige Fase

 = Oberfläche (Lack / Öl / Unbehandelt)

 = Nut und Feder

 = Dehnungs Nuten

Surfaces:

1

Lacquered surface

  • Our lac­quer seal­ing guar­an­tees an opti­mal pro­tec­tion and ensues a long ser­vices life.
  • A resis­tance for the high­est demands.
2

Oiled surface

  • A triple oil­ing guar­an­tees opti­mum pro­tec­tion and ensures a long ser­vice life.
  • Our oil sur­face has the dura­bil­i­ty of a lac­quer seal­ing.
3

Four-sided bevel

  • The edges are beveled on every side of the plank.
  • A pure look is cre­at­ed.
4

Brushed

  • The sur­face gets treat­ed with spe­cial brush­es so the soft annu­al rings are brushed out.
  • A nat­ur­al sur­face struc­ture is cre­at­ed.
5

Saw marks

  • By treat­ing the sur­face with a spe­cial saw inten­tion­al­ly spe­cial marks are made dur­ing the pro­duc­tion.
  • A nat­ur­al retro sur­face tex­ture is cre­at­ed.
6

Hand engraved

  • By treat­ing the sur­face with spe­cial slicers, wavy notch­es are made length­wise.
  • The clear­ly vis­i­ble plan­ing pro­vides an inter­est­ing play of light.
7

Underfloor heating suitable

  • Due to the tech­ni­cal struc­ture of this wood­en floor is espe­cial­ly rec­om­mend­ed for under­floor heat­ing.

Laying pat­terns:

1.Schiffboden_Verband

Random-Bond

  • In the Random-Bond, the indi­vid­ual par­quet-bars/­planks are laid con­tin­u­ous­ly, tak­ing care that there is no pat­tern.
  • The Random-Bond is the most pop­u­lar way of lay­ing plank floor­ing.
2.Englischer_Verband

Brick-Bond

  • At the Brick-Bond, the indi­vid­ual par­quet pieces / planks are laid con­tin­u­ous­ly, but here it is ensured that a con­sis­tent pat­tern is cre­at­ed.
3.Parallel_Verband

Parallel-Bond

  • In the case of the Parallel-Bond, the par­quet-pieces are laid in rows which, unlike the Random-Bond and Brick-Bond, are not dis­placed.
  • The Parallel-Bond looks geo­met­ric and order­ly.
4.Fischgrat

Herringbone-Bond

  • In the Herringbone-Bond, the par­quet pieces are arranged at right angles to each oth­er cre­at­ing a her­ring­bone pat­tern.
  • The Herringbone-Bond is par­tic­u­lar­ly ele­gant in large rooms.
5.Wuerfel_Verband

Cube-Bond

  • The Cube-Bond gives the room a pleas­ant peace.
6.Franzoesisch

French Chevron (45°)

  • The French Chevron is char­ac­ter­ized by a tapered lay­ing braid.
  • The French Chevron gives the room a calm and mod­ern touch.
7.Ungarisch

Hungarian Chevron (60°)

  • The Hungarian Chevron is char­ac­ter­ized by a tapered lay­ing braid.
  • The Hungarian Chevron gives the room a calm and mod­ern touch.
8.Leiter

Ladder-Bond

  • The Ladder-Bond is formed from the par­al­lel-bond by alter­nat­ing each row of par­al­lel adja­cent par­quet pieces with a sin­gle row trans­verse to it.
  • The Ladder-Bond looks geo­met­ric and order­ly.
9.Diagonal_Fischgrat

Diagonal Herringbone-Bond

  • In the Diagonal Herringbone-Bond, the par­quet pieces are arranged diag­o­nal­ly in the room at right angles to each oth­er cre­at­ing a her­ring­bone pat­tern.
  • The Herringbone-Bond is par­tic­u­lar­ly ele­gant in large rooms.
10.Schiffboden_Diagonal

Diagonal Random-Bond

  • In the case of the Diagonal Random-Bond, the indi­vid­ual par­quet-bars / planks are laid diag­o­nal­ly, con­sec­u­tive­ly to the room.
  • There should be no rec­og­niz­able pat­tern.

Wood species:

Hardness is a impor­tant cri­te­ri­on for wood­en floors. Every type of wood has its own hard­ness. The wood hard­ness is mea­sured with the so-called Brinell test, named after the Swedish engi­neer Johan August Brinell. During the test a ten mil­lime­tre steel ball is pressed with a spec­i­fied force and dura­tion against the sur­face of the test­ed wood. The Brinell val­ue is cal­cu­lat­ed from the result­ing score. The high­er the val­ue, the hard­er the wood is.

 

For heav­i­ly used rooms, eg street-shoes, we rec­om­mend wood­en floors with a high Brinell val­ue.

Maple

The Maple is found in the mod­er­ate cli­mates of the north­ern hemi­sphere. Nearly 200 species belong to the Maple fam­i­ly (Aceraceae), of which Central Europe (Acer pseudo­pla­tanus) pre­dom­i­nates. The tree can grow up to 15 m tall and reach a diam­e­ter of 40 cm. Heart- and sap­wood of the tree are almost the same col­or, white to yel­low­ish-white, with a sim­ple tex­ture. The wood itself is medi­um heavy, pret­ty hard, elas­tic and also tough. It is not weath­er­proof, but durable when it´s dry.
Hardness in Brinell:  28 N/mm2
Raw des­tiny:  620 kg/m3

Acacia

The genus of Acacia (Acacia) includes at least 1300 species world­wide. The tree itself can grow up to 15 m tall and reach a diam­e­ter of 60 cm. The sap­wood and the heart­wood are sharply sep­a­rat­ed, with the sap­wood being very nar­row and whitish to light yel­low and unus­able. The heart­wood is red-vio­let to pur­ple, irreg­u­lar in col­or and usu­al­ly lighter in the out­er parts. The wood itself is weath­er­proof and durable. In addi­tion, the Acacia is heavy, hard and dense which makes it per­fect for a wood­en floor.
Hardness in Brinell:  49 N/mm2
Raw den­si­ty:  730 kg/m3

Oak

The native Oak (Quercus) is wide­spread almost all over Europe. The tree itself reach­es a high age of sev­er­al hun­dred years and can grow in a favourable loca­tion up to 50 m high and reach a diam­e­ter of 200 cm. In the wood itself, sap­wood and heart­wood are sharply sep­a­rat­ed and the sap­wood is gen­er­al­ly nar­row and yel­low­ish-white. The wood shrinks lit­tle and is very durable. It is heavy, firm, hard and tough. In addi­tion, it sur­pass­es all oth­er European wood species in terms of strength, elas­tic­i­ty and dura­bil­i­ty, with the excep­tion of the Larch.
Hardness in Brinell:  37 N/mm2
Raw den­si­ty:  670 kg/m3

Ash-tree

The native Ash (Fraxinus excel­sior L.) occurs through­out Europe. Belonging to the so-called heart­wood trees, this means core and sap­wood are usu­al­ly the same col­or whitish to yel­low­ish or red­dish col­ored. Partly, a light to dark brown col­or core forms out, the so-called brown-core. The Ash-wood itself is heavy and hard. The very good strength prop­er­ties are large­ly com­pa­ra­ble to those of the Oak, as it is tough as hard­ly any oth­er wood. Above all, the high abra­sion resis­tance make the Ash very pop­u­lar as a wood­en floor.
Hardness in Brinell:  39 N/mm2
Raw den­si­ty:  690 kg/m3

Cherry-tree

The European Cherry-tree (Prunus avi­um L.) is a fast-grow­ing tree that reach­es an age of up to 100 years, a height of up to 20 m and a diam­e­ter of up to 100 cm. The sap­wood and heart­wood of the tree are only slight­ly dif­fer­ent. The sap­wood itself is nar­row and yel­low­ish or red­dish, while the heart­wood is wide and red­dish brown. The wood is very hard, firm, fair­ly pli­able and elas­tic, and does not shrink much.
Hardness in Brinell:  31 N/mm2
Raw den­si­ty:  600 kg/m3